PLAYSTATION GENERATION WELCOMES THE NISSAN URGE CONCEPT

Today, probably you’re one of those people (well, including me) who can’t live without a music. I admit, I can’t imagine life without carrying my music collection with me, where there are no hundreds of TV channels which includes the music channel of course, where money doesn’t come out of a hole in the wall ( but well that’s another story to tell). Looks familiar? Yes, teen agers usually have these “symptoms”. Well, we, I mean, they exist in a universe where it’s sometimes difficult to distinguish real life from the video game, but where the creative possibilities are endless. Record and mix your own music CD? Sure. Shoot and edit your own movie? No problem. Just download the software on to your home computer and start clicking the mouse. People, to young at heart like me, I still have these habits. Lol.

So, young people and to those young at hearts say hello to the new era of PlayStation. And also say hello to “their” sports car. There’s one new vehicle that can surely fit the lifestyle of the music freaks and gamers – it’s the new Nissan Urge. It was meant for the cyber-savvy savvy Gen-Y drivers, some of whom are yet to get their license, but the reason it exists is as old and primal as the automobile itself. It’s a performance car, pure and simple. The concept for the Urge actually came from an informal Internet survey that is conducted by Nissan intended to find out “why a lot of young men bought used pickup trucks as their first vehicle”. The answer that they got was straightforward: They’re cheap. So Okay, said Nissan, with our ever increasing problem in economy, we can’t have everything for $20,000 or less, but if you could have two things, what would they be? Answer: technology and performance.

But the technology stuff was not actually about the hardware of the vehicle itself, but how it intercat with the gadgets or components that the respondents used in their daily lives such as Mp3 players, video games, cell-phones and other stuffs that the Nissan folks expected to hear. And the strong desire to performance is definitely a surprise. The Urge is all about delivering that thrill. It starts with the lean, pared-down look, inspired by the exposed hardware on high-performance “naked” bikes, the ones without the sleek fairings wrapped around the frame. (It comes as no surprise to learn Cupit’s garage is full of old Italian bikes: Moto Guzzis, Laverdas, Ducatis.) Part of the Urge’s hood is glass, so you can see the engine and some of the car’s structure. The glass in the lower half of the doors retracts so you get a wind rush through the cabin.

The bodywork is pulled tightly around the mechanicals, tapered so much at the front and rear that the fenders almost look stuck on, like cycle guards. “It’s not the classic wedge that you see on a lot of sports cars,” says Cupit. “It’s kind of wide and stocky, but it looks light and nimble.” From some angles, it looks rather like a Lotus 340R, the stripped-back street racer built off the mid-engine Elise platform.

The massive shoulder and the way the body swells between the wheels is almost like a Formula 1 racer. The widest part of the Urge’s body is slightly wider than the outer surface of the tires, which helps occupant safety in side impacts. Safety considerations also drove the decision to give the Urge a rollbar linked to the windscreen structure to create a cage around the passengers. “These kids are practical,” says Cupit of the car’s target audience. “They’re going to be using their parents money to help them with this purchase, and they want their approval on this car also.”

New lighting technology allows a compact headlight package up front; at the rear, the taillights stick out from the bodywork like those on a motorcycle. “It’s a new idea and gives the car a completely different look.” Well, the perception of the people? This car will start a new era of cars that unites entertainment, performance and style.

~ by khia0486 on May 13, 2008.

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